Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 208

Thread: Netflix - Making a Murderer

  1. #51
    Tenacious D's Avatar
    The law is of supreme importance, or no importance.
    Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    16,647
    See Ignore List

    Default

    Just finished it.

    Hated / despised the DA, the smug cop who can be heard on the video in Avery's home chuckling, "Well, he won't be making that." in reference to an Innocence Project event, I absolutely think that the cops hated his ass, and were terrified of him owning the town / each of them. Loved Avery's parents and definitely his main counsel (the one who was driving, worried about Brendan's case, too). I ached for Brendan's mother, but agree with those here, it was lunacy to have those discussions on a jail line that was being recorded.

    That being said, the evidence clearly points to Avery having committed the crime, and I'm satisfied with his conviction.

    Also, I think that the claim against Brendan is much more dubious - his statements should not have been admissible - but I believe that he did exactly as he originally claimed, only later changed his story in a failed effort to deflect the severity of what he saw coming, and to explain it away. As such, while a sympathetic figure, I am ultimately satisfied in his conviction, too.

    All of the bleeding heart / stupid / meaningless other shit that some of you think trumps the fact that they actually committed the crimes being put well-aside, justice was done.

    Come at me, you bunch of pot-loving, class / race-baiting dipshits.

  2. #52
    Tenacious D's Avatar
    The law is of supreme importance, or no importance.
    Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    16,647
    See Ignore List

    Default

    I love that many of the same people who lamented that an allegation of racist cops let OJ walk, now think that an inept / allegedly revengeful police force somehow means Avery and Brendan should have went free.

  3. #53
    IP's Avatar
    Lyle's lynch mob community organizer
    IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    46,304
    See Ignore List

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A-Smith View Post
    The fact that he bought arm and leg shackles three weeks before and the kid describes her being shackled to the bed with chains independent of coaxing, because the cops didn't know about those details yet, is pretty convincing to me. Makes me think they're both in the right place.
    How about the fact that the alleged bed had no fibers from ropes and no marks from chains or ropes on it's frame, and there was no evidence for them being used in the room? Does that also convince you? It definitely didn't happen as he claimed it did.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tmac61 View Post
    I tried. I will continue to embarrass you in front of your friends.

  4. #54
    IP's Avatar
    Lyle's lynch mob community organizer
    IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    46,304
    See Ignore List

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tenacious D View Post
    Just finished it.

    Hated / despised the DA, the smug cop who can be heard on the video in Avery's home chuckling, "Well, he won't be making that." in reference to an Innocence Project event, I absolutely think that the cops hated his ass, and were terrified of him owning the town / each of them. Loved Avery's parents and definitely his main counsel (the one who was driving, worried about Brendan's case, too). I ached for Brendan's mother, but agree with those here, it was lunacy to have those discussions on a jail line that was being recorded.

    That being said, the evidence clearly points to Avery having committed the crime, and I'm satisfied with his conviction.

    Also, I think that the claim against Brendan is much more dubious - his statements should not have been admissible - but I believe that he did exactly as he originally claimed, only later changed his story in a failed effort to deflect the severity of what he saw coming, and to explain it away. As such, while a sympathetic figure, I am ultimately satisfied in his conviction, too.

    All of the bleeding heart / stupid / meaningless other shit that some of you think trumps the fact that they actually committed the crimes being put well-aside, justice was done.

    Come at me, you bunch of pot-loving, class / race-baiting dipshits.
    So you're satisfied with convicting people on false evidence and/or a broken system?
    Quote Originally Posted by Tmac61 View Post
    I tried. I will continue to embarrass you in front of your friends.

  5. #55
    Tenacious D's Avatar
    The law is of supreme importance, or no importance.
    Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    16,647
    See Ignore List

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IP View Post
    How about the fact that the alleged bed had no fibers from ropes and no marks from chains or ropes on it's frame, and there was no evidence for them being used in the room? Does that also convince you? It definitely didn't happen as he claimed it did.
    Her DNA wasn't found on her own car key. So?

    Avery bought chains and handcuffs - where were the fibers to have come from?

    Are you arguing that it's impossible that three weren't chains attached to the bed in some fashion, and left no marks, or they went unobserved? Come on.

    Do you know many people "confess" and admit to lesser things, in hopes of explaining obvious involvement, but without being too incriminating to larger and more serious deeds? Or who begin to realize that they've messed up, said too much, and begin to messily obfuscate the whole narrative, so as to essentially minimize a statement and attempt to walk it back? About 3/4's of them, conservatively.

    And, finally, it needn't have to happen the way Brendan described it to be more than sufficient to earn a justifiable conviction.

    You guys seem to have gotten so wrapped up in the story of the pitiful poor people fighting The Man, as to forget that they are rapists and murderers. Because that's exactly what they are.

  6. #56

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tenacious D View Post
    Her DNA wasn't found on her own car key. So?

    Avery bought chains and handcuffs - where were the fibers to have come from?

    Are you arguing that it's impossible that three weren't chains attached to the bed in some fashion, and left no marks, or they went unobserved? Come on.

    Do you know many people "confess" and admit to lesser things, in hopes of explaining obvious involvement, but without being too incriminating to larger and more serious deeds? Or who begin to realize that they've messed up, said too much, and begin to messily obfuscate the whole narrative, so as to essentially minimize a statement and attempt to walk it back? About 3/4's of them, conservatively.

    And, finally, it needn't have to happen the way Brendan described it to be more than sufficient to earn a justifiable conviction.

    You guys seem to have gotten so wrapped up in the story of the pitiful poor people fighting The Man, as to forget that they are rapists and murderers. Because that's exactly what they are.
    Where in the hell did you get this statistic? And, where in the hell do you get this idea that Dassey is in any way able to concoct such a method to obfuscate a confession in this manner?

    And, no, it doesn't necessarily have to happen in the manner in which Dassey described, but there does need to be some amount of evidence to support that conviction in spite of the unreliable "confession". Dassey was convicted of rape, or sexual assault, which isn't supported anywhere but in this confession an even further, the physical evidence of such a charge is notably lacking. He said that they raped and slashed the throat of Halbach in the bedroom. Where is the evidence of this?

    I think the idea that it's alright that they were convicted because they, probably, in your mind, did it, sort of spits in the face of a lot of fundamental elements of the American legal system.

  7. #57
    IP's Avatar
    Lyle's lynch mob community organizer
    IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    46,304
    See Ignore List

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tenacious D View Post
    Her DNA wasn't found on her own car key. So?

    Avery bought chains and handcuffs - where were the fibers to have come from?

    Are you arguing that it's impossible that three weren't chains attached to the bed in some fashion, and left no marks, or they went unobserved? Come on.

    Do you know many people "confess" and admit to lesser things, in hopes of explaining obvious involvement, but without being too incriminating to larger and more serious deeds? Or who begin to realize that they've messed up, said too much, and begin to messily obfuscate the whole narrative, so as to essentially minimize a statement and attempt to walk it back? About 3/4's of them, conservatively.

    And, finally, it needn't have to happen the way Brendan described it to be more than sufficient to earn a justifiable conviction.

    You guys seem to have gotten so wrapped up in the story of the pitiful poor people fighting The Man, as to forget that they are rapists and murderers. Because that's exactly what they are.
    1. So that is basically impossible.

    2. From the ropes that Brendan said he used for her arms. Go and look at his testimony. That is why the were looking for fibers on the headboard and found none. That is what I mean by his story not actually fitting the evidence. If chains were used, why did he say ropes for her arms and draw that in the illustration? You can dismiss this if you want, but then you aren't presuming evidence.

    3. I'm arguing that the only evidence of there being chains is that he a) had purchased chains recently and b) a mentally limited 16 year old had been coerced into saying she was restrained on the bed (but said ropes were used for her hands). Is this about evidence or isn't it?

    4. Yes, I am aware of that happening, though I couldn't say what percentage of "people" do this. Do you think that was what Brendan was doing? Is he that clever?

    5. It does if what put Brendan away was a confession that doesn't fit the evidence.

    They're rapists and murderers? Maybe. If you think that the documentary is about their innocence, you are completely missing the point. You're actually the one wrapped up in their story, I'm wrapped up in the irrefutable errors and problems that occurred within the justice system during their cases.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tmac61 View Post
    I tried. I will continue to embarrass you in front of your friends.

  8. #58
    Tenacious D's Avatar
    The law is of supreme importance, or no importance.
    Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    16,647
    See Ignore List

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IP View Post
    So you're satisfied with convicting people on false evidence and/or a broken system?
    What is the false evidence?

    That the criminal justice system is lacking, and in many substantive ways is true. But when it sends two murdeous rapists to prison, it's difficult to consider it "broken".

    You do realize that this is what happened, right?

  9. #59

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tenacious D View Post
    Just finished it.

    Hated / despised the DA, the smug cop who can be heard on the video in Avery's home chuckling, "Well, he won't be making that." in reference to an Innocence Project event, I absolutely think that the cops hated his ass, and were terrified of him owning the town / each of them. Loved Avery's parents and definitely his main counsel (the one who was driving, worried about Brendan's case, too). I ached for Brendan's mother, but agree with those here, it was lunacy to have those discussions on a jail line that was being recorded.

    That being said, the evidence clearly points to Avery having committed the crime, and I'm satisfied with his conviction.

    Also, I think that the claim against Brendan is much more dubious - his statements should not have been admissible - but I believe that he did exactly as he originally claimed, only later changed his story in a failed effort to deflect the severity of what he saw coming, and to explain it away. As such, while a sympathetic figure, I am ultimately satisfied in his conviction, too.

    All of the bleeding heart / stupid / meaningless other shit that some of you think trumps the fact that they actually committed the crimes being put well-aside, justice was done.

    Come at me, you bunch of pot-loving, class / race-baiting dipshits.
    Agree 100% with this.

  10. #60
    Tenacious D's Avatar
    The law is of supreme importance, or no importance.
    Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    16,647
    See Ignore List

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Unimane View Post
    Where in the hell did you get this statistic? And, where in the hell do you get this idea that Dassey is in any way able to concoct such a method to obfuscate a confession in this manner?

    And, no, it doesn't necessarily have to happen in the manner in which Dassey described, but there does need to be some amount of evidence to support that conviction in spite of the unreliable "confession". Dassey was convicted of rape, or sexual assault, which isn't supported anywhere but in this confession an even further, the physical evidence of such a charge is notably lacking. He said that they raped and slashed the throat of Halbach in the bedroom. Where is the evidence of this?

    I think the idea that it's alright that they were convicted because they, probably, in your mind, did it, sort of spits in the face of a lot of fundamental elements of the American legal system.
    Where did I get this statistic? Personally direct experience. Leave it at that.

    All that you know of the case against Brendan is what the documentary covered. How many times did the kid have to admit to doing it, before you believe him? Was he also being coercively exploited when freely admitting to his participation in the crime, during the phone conversation with his mother, in the article previously linked?

    This case fits the narrative you most prefer, and so you assume it to be true. I can only imagine how sad you must be that neither Avery nor Brendan were also black. Or socialists. Or both.

  11. #61

    Default

    I thought what the judge said about the likelihood of Steven doing it again was spot on. He did it at the height of his good fortune. There would be future victims if he had walked.

  12. #62

    Default

    Kid clearly told his cousin what he had seen. Also admitted to his mother. The kid was dumb, but after watching him testify, I think he was smart enough not to admit to something he didn't do. The cops did a good job getting him to come clean by making it feel (though not explicitly saying) as if there wouldn't be any consequences. Kudos to them for that.

  13. #63
    Tenacious D's Avatar
    The law is of supreme importance, or no importance.
    Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    16,647
    See Ignore List

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IP View Post
    1. So that is basically impossible.

    2. From the ropes that Brendan said he used for her arms. Go and look at his testimony. That is why the were looking for fibers on the headboard and found none. That is what I mean by his story not actually fitting the evidence. If chains were used, why did he say ropes for her arms and draw that in the illustration? You can dismiss this if you want, but then you aren't presuming evidence.

    3. I'm arguing that the only evidence of there being chains is that he a) had purchased chains recently and b) a mentally limited 16 year old had been coerced into saying she was restrained on the bed (but said ropes were used for her hands). Is this about evidence or isn't it?

    4. Yes, I am aware of that happening, though I couldn't say what percentage of "people" do this. Do you think that was what Brendan was doing? Is he that clever?

    5. It does if what put Brendan away was a confession that doesn't fit the evidence.

    They're rapists and murderers? Maybe. If you think that the documentary is about their innocence, you are completely missing the point. You're actually the one wrapped up in their story, I'm wrapped up in the irrefutable errors and problems that occurred within the justice system during their cases.
    I could be mistaken, and Brendan mentioned ropes, instead. However, the lack of fibers is noteworthy, but (obviously) not damning to the prosecution. You know, there are plenty of ropes that don't fray and leave fibers, right? And if the rope is destroyed (you know, like in a fire) what then what would you expect them to compare any fibers to, exactly, even if found?

    And exactly how clever would Brendan need to be in order to understand self-preservation?

    The documentary did an excellent job of describing the initial jury vote, and in insinuating some possible mixed motives / misdeeds of the three "guilty" voters in that informal poll (like so many JFK conspiracies, the problem here is that the list of conspirators just continues to grow, and grow, and grow...). However, I'd suggest that you give consideration to the fact that this same jury of Avery's peers also and ultimately found both guilty, too.

    I agree that the documentary was about the entirety of the criminal justice system, and that's a discussion well worth having. But they do it no good deed by using this case, or in pointing to the shadows of conspiracy in their events, to initiate it. There are undoubtedly innocent people in jail - but these two are not amongst them.

  14. #64

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tenacious D View Post
    Where did I get this statistic? Personally direct experience. Leave it at that.

    All that you know of the case against Brendan is what the documentary covered. How many times did the kid have to admit to doing it, before you believe him? Was he also being coercively exploited when freely admitting to his participation in the crime, during the phone conversation with his mother, in the article previously linked?

    This case fits the narrative you most prefer, and so you assume it to be true. I can only imagine how sad you must be that neither Avery nor Brendan were also black. Or socialists. Or both.
    I can only assume that the last stanza of baloney is merely meant to divert away from the fact that you don't seem to be interested in the rule of law in cases where it doesn't suit your viewpoint. I imagine that you would be more condemning of the manner in which the case was prosecuted against Avery were it done by illegal immigrants and thus "the law is the law" concept would apply.

    Otherwise, if I am going to buy some kind of made up statistic on the say so of "personal direct experience", then I'll proffer the same when I say that I've dealt with many Brendan Dasseys and I could've gotten him to confess to the JFK assassination and the murders of Tupac and Biggie, especially with the manner in which he "confessed".

  15. #65

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tenacious D View Post
    I could be mistaken, and Brendan mentioned ropes, instead. However, the lack of fibers is noteworthy, but (obviously) not damning to the prosecution. You know, there are plenty of ropes that don't fray and leave fibers, right? And if the rope is destroyed (you know, like in a fire) what then what would you expect them to compare any fibers to, exactly, even if found?

    And exactly how clever would Brendan need to be in order to understand self-preservation?

    The documentary did an excellent job of describing the initial jury vote, and in insinuating some possible mixed motives / misdeeds of the three "guilty" voters in that informal poll (like so many JFK conspiracies, the problem here is that the list of conspirators just continues to grow, and grow, and grow...). However, I'd suggest that you give consideration to the fact that this same jury of Avery's peers also and ultimately found both guilty, too.

    I agree that the documentary was about the entirety of the criminal justice system, and that's a discussion well worth having. But they do it no good deed by using this case, or in pointing to the shadows of conspiracy in their events, to initiate it. There are undoubtedly innocent people in jail - but these two are not amongst them.
    Actually, it's a perfect reason to pick those two as the focus of the documentary and, if you think this was some big innocence project video, then you missed the entire point of the 10 hours. The fact that they would cut corners in order to convict people they "know" are guilty is a huge indictment of the judicial system. It works, or should work, because it is designed to protect the rights of those like Avery.

    It may, in fact, surprise you to know that I am about 75% convinced of Avery's guilt. Of course, him not being black or a socialist, that I know, may be the reason for this. However, if they can have such a shoddy system that it takes a false rape conviction and seriously compromised set of circumstances to put him away, then I raise an issue and feel it is well worthy of investigation. Because, I'll let you know, also, that quite a few of the wrongly convicted people in this country aren't exactly choir boys persecuted by the police.

  16. #66

    Default

    I put myself in the shoes of a juror. I believe he did it.

    However, to me, the state did not adequately remove the doubt in my mind. What I think it pointless. What the DA and defense think is pointless. From the facts presented there's no way I could claim guilty. Hell after reading stuff from the interwebz after the fact, I still have some serious doubts.
    Fire them all.

  17. #67
    IP's Avatar
    Lyle's lynch mob community organizer
    IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    46,304
    See Ignore List

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tenacious D View Post
    I could be mistaken, and Brendan mentioned ropes, instead. However, the lack of fibers is noteworthy, but (obviously) not damning to the prosecution. You know, there are plenty of ropes that don't fray and leave fibers, right? And if the rope is destroyed (you know, like in a fire) what then what would you expect them to compare any fibers to, exactly, even if found?

    And exactly how clever would Brendan need to be in order to understand self-preservation?

    The documentary did an excellent job of describing the initial jury vote, and in insinuating some possible mixed motives / misdeeds of the three "guilty" voters in that informal poll (like so many JFK conspiracies, the problem here is that the list of conspirators just continues to grow, and grow, and grow...). However, I'd suggest that you give consideration to the fact that this same jury of Avery's peers also and ultimately found both guilty, too.

    I agree that the documentary was about the entirety of the criminal justice system, and that's a discussion well worth having. But they do it no good deed by using this case, or in pointing to the shadows of conspiracy in their events, to initiate it. There are undoubtedly innocent people in jail - but these two are not amongst them.
    He definitely stated and drew ropes for the arms (chains for the legs). I agree that the lack of fibers is not damning to the case against Avery, but it is indeed noteworthy for evaluating Brendan's "confession." I agree that there would be nothing to compare fibers to, but I don't see how that matters. Rope fibers in the bedroom would be corroborating to the confession. It is reasonable to assume rope fibers are not typically found in bedrooms. I agree that some ropes fray and leave fibers more than others. However, if such a rope were used, it would be more likely to leave marks on the bed frame and I think real examination would be required before we can safely state that these higher quality ropes could be expected to leave no trace.

    Brendan was clearly not clever enough to understand self-preservation, guilty or not. I don't know why you even ask that when the answer was/is self-evident and not in your favor.

    I whole-heartedly agree with you that one of the aspects working against Avery is the complexity of the conspiracy necessary for him to be innocent. We're talking about a combination of corrupt cops, public bias, incompetent judges, a prosecution with tunnel vision, and a stupid nephew. However, there isn't a magic bullet or bad chemistry present in this narrative. Some of those items are somewhat subjective, but some are demonstrable. Let's keep in mind that this town in general views the family as a nefarious presence and that the defense raised the issue of not being able to get a fair trial in the county at the outset. I again remind you that this discussion is not really about his innocence, but rather a failure of the system. The ends do not justify the means.

    You nor I can be reasonably sure whether they are guilty or not, because we can not trust the evidence or the confession in this case. That's a problem.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tmac61 View Post
    I tried. I will continue to embarrass you in front of your friends.

  18. #68
    IP's Avatar
    Lyle's lynch mob community organizer
    IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    46,304
    See Ignore List

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NYYVol View Post
    I put myself in the shoes of a juror. I believe he did it.

    However, to me, the state did not adequately remove the doubt in my mind. What I think it pointless. What the DA and defense think is pointless. From the facts presented there's no way I could claim guilty. Hell after reading stuff from the interwebz after the fact, I still have some serious doubts.
    I honestly don't know what I would do. I would be horrified at the shoddy job the state had done in investigating the case, but that doesn't mean Avery is innocent. I guess I'd want to push for a mistrial, but I don't know that a jury can directly do that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tmac61 View Post
    I tried. I will continue to embarrass you in front of your friends.

  19. #69
    Tenacious D's Avatar
    The law is of supreme importance, or no importance.
    Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    16,647
    See Ignore List

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IP View Post
    I honestly don't know what I would do. I would be horrified at the shoddy job the state had done in investigating the case, but that doesn't mean Avery is innocent. I guess I'd want to push for a mistrial, but I don't know that a jury can directly do that.
    I could not have opposed a mistrial. But the state was going to prosecute that one until they got him, for sure.

    You know, I just thought about something - no, i'm not changing my mind - while there was no EDTA found in Avery's bloodstains....after that, the documentary went silent as to what then did happen with that blood? It wasn't used to plant his blood - but what was it used for, who accessed it, why, etc.?

    And, for the life of me, I can't figure out how he killed her. Were it not for the bullet in the garage, I'd say that he put her in the fire pit and shot her there, hence, no blood or DNA anywhere else. I wonder if the police just found a bullet, put her DNA on it, and claimed to have found it in the garage so as to explain how it was preserved.

  20. #70
    Tenacious D's Avatar
    The law is of supreme importance, or no importance.
    Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    16,647
    See Ignore List

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Unimane View Post
    I can only assume that the last stanza of baloney is merely meant to divert away from the fact that you don't seem to be interested in the rule of law in cases where it doesn't suit your viewpoint. I imagine that you would be more condemning of the manner in which the case was prosecuted against Avery were it done by illegal immigrants and thus "the law is the law" concept would apply.

    Otherwise, if I am going to buy some kind of made up statistic on the say so of "personal direct experience", then I'll proffer the same when I say that I've dealt with many Brendan Dasseys and I could've gotten him to confess to the JFK assassination and the murders of Tupac and Biggie, especially with the manner in which he "confessed".
    I think that every illegal immigrant should be deported to protest the possibly wrong imprisonment of Brendan Dassey.

    Common ground?

  21. #71
    IP's Avatar
    Lyle's lynch mob community organizer
    IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    46,304
    See Ignore List

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tenacious D View Post
    I could not have opposed a mistrial. But the state was going to prosecute that one until they got him, for sure.

    You know, I just thought about something - no, i'm not changing my mind - while there was no EDTA found in Avery's bloodstains....after that, the documentary went silent as to what then did happen with that blood? It wasn't used to plant his blood - but what was it used for, who accessed it, why, etc.?

    And, for the life of me, I can't figure out how he killed her. Were it not for the bullet in the garage, I'd say that he put her in the fire pit and shot her there, hence, no blood or DNA anywhere else. I wonder if the police just found a bullet, put her DNA on it, and claimed to have found it in the garage so as to explain how it was preserved.
    I've wondered the same. It is possible that the lab did indeed access it with a needle and screw it up for whatever reason that has no bearing on the case, but runs into the same sort of complexity issues as an "anti-conspiracy" as the conspiracy angle. I've also wondered why the FBI guy was allowed to make the statements he did, given they were not accurate. The EDTA test can prove blood came from an EDTA tube. It absolutely cannot disprove it did (even if negative). That is not how the FBI agent represented it to the jury. Not that I think that point would make a huge difference in itself since really only a positive test would add new information.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tmac61 View Post
    I tried. I will continue to embarrass you in front of your friends.

  22. #72
    Tenacious D's Avatar
    The law is of supreme importance, or no importance.
    Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy Tenacious D Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    16,647
    See Ignore List

    Default

    Moving beyond poking everyone in the eye phase....

    The part where Brendan admits to rape and accessory to murder...and then asks if he can be done before 1:20, because he had a project due in 6th period....that was a tough moment for me, watching it.

  23. #73

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tenacious D View Post
    Moving beyond poking everyone in the eye phase....

    The part where Brendan admits to rape and accessory to murder...and then asks if he can be done before 1:20, because he had a project due in 6th period....that was a tough moment for me, watching it.
    Or when he asks if he'll be out in time to watch WrestleMania.

  24. #74
    IP's Avatar
    Lyle's lynch mob community organizer
    IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy IP Excellent & Trustworthy

    Status
    Offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    46,304
    See Ignore List

    Default

    I've also thought on how the popularity of this documentary taints any future trial for these two. Too many people are confusing Wisconsin DOJ and local police screw-ups/framings with "he didn't do it." Maybe he didn't, but there is nothing that actually clears him presented either.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tmac61 View Post
    I tried. I will continue to embarrass you in front of your friends.

  25. #75

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tenacious D View Post
    And, for the life of me, I can't figure out how he killed her. Were it not for the bullet in the garage, I'd say that he put her in the fire pit and shot her there, hence, no blood or DNA anywhere else. I wonder if the police just found a bullet, put her DNA on it, and claimed to have found it in the garage so as to explain how it was preserved.
    Could he have put some plastic down in the garage and shot her on it? I'd still think though there would have been some splatter somewhere in the garage. I find it really hard to believe he killed her in the garage too.

    I've several pieces that linked the bullet found to the gun he had over his bead.

Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •